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Realistic Texturing 
By PlayBoy on Aug 11, 2001 08:11 PM
Hey all
My name is Filip Nowakowski, and im new to this forum here so il just start by introducing myself. Im 16 years old, and I have been doing 3D Modeling and graphics for over 4 years. I was born in Poland, but currently live in Canada. I currently use 3ds max 4 for my work, as well as Photoshop for my texturing. My website is currently under-construction, so you really cant see any of my work on there, but I will put it up soon, if not il just post some of my latest work on the forum.

So anyways, back to my question... It seems to be very hard for me to do 2 things; realistic texturing and lighting. I can model pretty much anything, but when it comes to texturing the objects  and ligthing them, my work seems to look unproffesional and just plain. Basicaly what I do is just slap a texture on it, with some specular maps and maybe some glossiness, but it still looks like crap. Hehe.  Ive been doing alot of in-game character modeling / texturing / animating for the game company I am currently with, but I find that making good textures for characters is difficult, even in photoshop. Im good at making skin, hehe but thats about it. What about Jeans, or shirts, or faces? Does anyone have any tips, suggestions, or tutorials for this kinda stuff? Any help on lighting and texturing would be very much appreciated.

Thanks
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By Koztah3d on Aug 11, 2001 08:45 PM
Well, use texporter (saves lotsa time unwrapping), and for fabrics, try usin a picture of the garment in question as a reference, it helps a lot, and if your textures are big enough, like 512x512, you might consider adding some small repeating cloth texture before you shrink it down, it won't show much on the character, but it'll make a difference. Also, study how real cloth drapes and folds for drawing your creases on your maps!
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By Boksworld on Jan 24, 2002 05:56 AM
Hey there. I work at a visual effects company, where I specialise in textures, and because they are for broadcast and have to be integrated into live action footage, I have to make sure they are 100% convincing. The best tips I can give are:
SPECULAR MAPS: probably the most important surface attribute. Nothing in real life has a constant perfect specularity - wherever things touch the object the specularity is changed. Whether it's fingerprints, scratches, polished areas - all these change the specularity of the surface. A perfectly even specular map is alsways the first giveaway that something is CG.
DIFFUSE: Particularly with metallic objects, diffusion comes into play. The darker the object, the more light it absorbs. Diffuse is basically the opposite of specular. Whereas specularity defines where light is reflected, diffuse defines where it is absorbed. Diffusion can make an object appear cold or hot, thus giving it a lot of life.
REFLECTION: Never overdo reflection. That's a big giveaway that the object is computer generated. All too often you see metal objects (cars, weapons etc) that have too much reflection. Observe how reflective things really are when you are making them. Specularity also affects reflection a lot - for instance, a mirror that has fingerprints in it's specularity, will also be less reflective in those areas. So always stick a copy of you specular map into your reflection channel. Also, most metals have blurred reflection which you should make use of if your software supports it (I personally use LightWave which has a blurred reflection plugin).
RADIOSITY: More to do with lighting than texturing, if your software supports it, USE IT. It's very subtle but essential to create the real life effect of colour bouncing around in your scene, and affecting your surfaces.
BUMP MAPS: Never overdo bumps, or use them for harsh reflief effects. In other words don't attempt to compensate for lack of modelling detail with bump maps - they look crap.
SIZE OF TEXTURE MAPS: Don't you hate it when you get in close to your objects and they look pixellated? Use this formula: Take the size of your final rendered frame, and however large (in pixels) that object appears in the frame, times it by two, and use that as the base size of your images that you are maing in Photoshop as texture maps. Eg: if the frame is going to be rendered at 720 X 576, then the biggest your object will be seen is at that size. So multiply that by 2, and make your image size of your Photoshop document at that size, as well as at least 100Dpi to ensure that they do not pixellate.
That's the basics.
The most important thing is to constantly observe the world around you. When you look at an object, try and look at it's different attributes: what does it's specularity look like? How glossy is it? How reflective is it? How would you define those in an image? Just look really carefully at reality around you and understand how that translates into CG.
Also with regards to actually wrapping them onto your objects, always use a UV Unwrapping plugin - this always ensures perfect placement of your texture onto the surface.

Last modification: Leigh - 01/24/02 at 06:56:08
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By Wizz on Jan 24, 2002 09:31 AM
wow your 16 and work in a company?
started in age 12 ,wow!
i am 15&half ,just started a month ago :)
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By Yanni_Mac on Jan 24, 2002 12:38 PM
If you want a good lighting solution and have the money, buy finalRender.  It's definately the best render plugin available for max.  It's better and faster than Brazil.  Check out the website and look at some of the images created with it.  They are pretty amazing.  www.finalRender.com
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By Gilgamesh on Feb 06, 2002 10:21 PM
First of all, great post, Leigh van der Byl.
As for Lighting, finalRender looks gorgeous, but Brazil is free. There is another free GI Renderer that I think works pretty well called VRay, which can be downloaded at <a href>http://www.chaoticdimension.com/downloads</a>
(I hope I did the tags right).
Also there is one that I haven't used called Luminaire, which as I understand is also free. I don't know much about it, though.
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By Gilgamesh on Feb 06, 2002 10:22 PM
How on earth do you put links in these things then?
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Re: Realistic Texturing 
By ripLEE on Jun 08, 2004 11:47 AM
Hey there. I work at a visual effects company, where I specialise in textures, and because they are for broadcast and have to be integrated into live action footage, I have to make sure they are 100% convincing. <br><br>Last modification: Leigh - 01/24/02 at 06:56:08


How come this is not reflected in your gallery work? Ever werked on any films/shows any of us might be familiar with?
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