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Magazine Article 
By fenghao on Apr 03, 2014 02:48 AM
<P>Magazine Article</P><P></P><P>And how about Bill Gates? Last year, his $92.7 billion fortune put him on top of our list and gave him an $80.3 billion lead over Oracle's Replica Patrick Kane Jersey founder, Larry Ellison. Gates is still in first place, even though $38.3 billion was hacked off his fortune. But now, he's only $12.3 billion ahead of his nemesis, Ellison, on our list. The Oracle founder's decision to switch from client/server computing to an Internet based model helped boost his fortune by some $29.6 billion, to $42.1 billion, since our last list in November 1999.</P><P></P><P>Pure Internet moguls were not so fortunate. The hottest Internet stocks of 1999 were hammered in 2000. For all those formerly rich CMGI stockholders with pennies jiggling in their piggy banks, there's good news: You're not alone. CMGI's David Wetherell was knocked off his perch as the 22nd richest last year to 79th this year, having lost 84% of his wealth. Despite the best efforts of ubiquitous ham William Shatner, who cashed out about 25% of his stock before the fall, Priceline's Jay Walker sank from 11th to 91st; at last count he was worth $190 million. Time magazine's former Man of the Year, the preternaturally optimistic Jeff Bezos, fell from seventh with $7.3 billion, to 16th this year, with $2.3 billion. Search engine software was hit hard along with portals; thus, Inktomi put three guys on the list in 1999 and none this time around (Chief Scientist Eric Brewer saw his fortune slip from $460 million to $80 million).</P><P></P><P>It actually was a little tougher to get on the list this year as well. The last spot belongs to Susan Orr, a former director of Hewlett Packard, with $182.9 million. A year ago, No. 100, Steve Kirsch of Infoseek, needed just $167.4 million to make the cut. The 30th spot on this year's list cost $1.37 billion and belongs to Vincent Smith from Quest Software; last year that spot was claimed by Apple's Steve Jobs with $1.02 billion. (Jobs has $1.38 billion this time around, which gets him the No. 29 spot.)</P><P></P><P>After last year's stumble, it's easy to forget that the technology sector has created enormous amounts of wealth in recent years. So we should note that, while the $256.6 billion total wealth of our 100 richest doesn't quite measure up to the 1999 figure, it far surpasses the $152.9 billion figure of two years ago and the $108.6 billion of three years ago. Turns out that the old saying is mostly right: The rich, as a group at least, may not always get richer. But their tendency to accumulate wealth even in tough times is awfully impressive. And if that isn't an old saying, well then, it should be.</P><P></P><P>Microsoft, Redmond, WABill Gates has lost a jaw dropping $38.3 billion since our last list. It wasn't just the court order to break up the company that caused Microsoft stock to sink last year. Gates' monopoly has had less than stunning Internet initiatives, and then there's the slowdown in PC sales. Still, he's got more than a little spare change.</P><P></P><P>Once a simple Canadian gas pumper, Skoll went on to become eBay's head of strategic planning and one of Canada's five richest people. Not bad, eh? Lately, Skoll has cut back, devoting more time to philanthropy: He has donated $50 million to a Silicon Valley foundation and $7.5 million to the University of Toronto, and is backing a new program to encourage Canadian tech entrepreneurs. Oh, and he finally replaced his '89 Mazda RX 7 with a new car but only because the Mazda broke down.</P><P></P><P>Semiconductor packaging and testing company Amkor is a true case of East meets West. The firm whose name is a combination of "America" and "Korea" was founded by former Villanova economics professor Kim in 1968. marketing arm of Anam, his father's Korean based semiconductor firm. By 1998 Amkor was the world's leading independent chipmaker. Kim's net worth took a $3.6 billion tumble last year thanks to the PC slowdown, but he has been through hard times before: When the company struggled to meet payroll in the '70s, Kim's wife, Agnes, helped raise cash by selling calculators and radios from a mall kiosk which eventually became Electronics Boutique, a worldwide electronics firm.</P><P></P><P>Kriens is among a lucky few folks in the technology sector to have gotten much, much richer last year: His fortune is up 157%. The reason: Juniper keeps killing Cisco with its high end routers, which sell for around $400,000 a pop. The firm's technology is six to nine months ahead of its bigger rival's, helping Juniper grab 30% of the market just two years after it began shipping products. Kriens' fortune, though, hiccuped at the end of the year, as Juniper shares fell 48% from their $244.50 October peak, due to investor worries about slumping demand for its products.</P><P></P><P>Legendary venture capitalist Vinod Khosla calls Sindhu "tech's biggest unsung hero." The Juniper founder and former Xerox PARC principal scientist has expanded routers' capabilities, making Juniper the only company so far to seriously threaten Cisco and permanently alter the Internet's backbone technology. Pretty smart. He also was bright enough to know that he made a better CTO than CEO, and after running the company for seven months, relinquished the reins to No. 25, Scott Kriens, in 1996.</P><P></P><P>Case, a devout Christian, must have felt like the Biblical Job in 2000. The merger of AOL and Time Warner, announced in January of that year, was supposed to turn his Internet blue chip into a real world blue chip. But investors pummeled the stock because it was no longer a pure Internet play; then they dumped it for being an Internet stock when that sector tanked. The stock fell more than 50% and Case lost $870.2 million. In 1992 she joined No. 21 Jeff Hawkins and No. 93 Ed Colligan to found Palm, where the trio created the PalmPilot the fastest selling new computer product ever. Robotics in 1995 and in July 1998 started Handspring, where they repeated their success: The company's dexterous Visor PDA has seized a 23% market share. Meanwhile, Microsoft's handheld computers repeatedly have floundered.</P><P></P><P>This once hot data mining company's motto is "Intelligence www.hockeyblackhawksshop.com/patrick_kane_jersey.html Everywhere" but the people in the bookkeeping department ain't so smart. MicroStrategy shares took a 70% nosedive during two days last March, when the company announced it overstated 1999 revenues by 25% and posted a loss for Patrick Sharp Authentic Jersey the year not its previously reported profit. Since then, the stock is down another 85%, and Saylor (who owns 55% of the firm) and other company executives have been ordered to pay out more than $10 million in fines and stock to the SEC http://www.hockeyblackhawksshop.com/patrick_sharp_jersey.html the largest penalty ever for such misconduct. Total decline in Saylor's wealth since our last list: $161.2 million.</P>
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