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Managing Editor Audrey Cooper  
By dengdai on Mar 22, 2014 03:25 AM
NEW YORK -- Sean Payton slipped out a back entrance from NFL headquarters and directly into to a waiting car. ray ban sunglasses . The New Orleans Saints Super Bowl-winning coach now must wait for Commissioner Roger Goodell to decide whether he will reduce any of the penalties in the teams bounty scandal. Payton declined comment Thursday after meeting with Goodell to discuss the season-long suspension he received for his role in the bounty system. Earlier, the commissioner heard appeals from general manager Mickey Loomis and assistant coach Joe Vitt. Goodell suspended Payton for all of next season, while Loomis was suspended for eight games and Vitt for six. The Saints were fined $500,000 and docked second-round draft picks this year and next. Goodell spent six hours Thursday hearing appeals, meeting separately with team representatives, Loomis, Vitt and finally Payton. Goodell plans to make a decision quickly but has not specified a timetable. Vitt, with lawyer David Cornwell, was the only Saints official to speak to the media gathered outside the league offices, where a lone fan held up a "Free Sean Payton" sign. Cornwell said Vitt understood he had to be held accountable, but they wanted to convey that the coach did not participate in a strategy to injure players. "I thought the commissioner was extremely receptive," Cornwell said. Asked if he thought his punishment would be reduced, Vitt said: "I have no feel for that." "The commissioners got a tough job," he added. "Ive worked hard to earn the respect of my players and now I want to earn his respect." The former New Orleans defensive co-ordinator at the centre of the bounties case, Gregg Williams, was suspended indefinitely and did not appeal. Williams was hired by the St. Louis Rams on Jan. 23 as their defensive co-ordinator. NFL investigators concluded that from 2009-11, the Saints offered improper cash bonuses for big hits that either knocked opponents out of games or left them needing help off the field. The appeals came on a day when a documentary maker released what he said was an audio recording of Williams speaking before the Saints playoff loss to the 49ers. In a speech filled with profanities, Williams tells his defence to go after specific San Francisco players. Filmmaker Sean Pamphilon, who had access to Saints meetings for a documentary on football, posted the audio on his website. Pamphilon initially shared the content with Yahoo Sports, telling the website that while he was not bothered by much of Williams profanity-laced speech, he was troubled by comments about a previously concussed player. Cornwell said Payton viewed Williams comments on the recording as "a rogue coach about to get fired." "He was fired two days later," said Cornwell, the executive director of the NFL Coaches Association. "He was on the way out." But when Williams left New Orleans for the Rams in January, nobody with the Saints characterized it as a firing. At the time, Payton said it was apparent shortly before the season ended that Williams, with his contract expiring, was likely going to join new St. Louis coach Jeff Fisher, an old friend. The Saints and Williams never discussed an extension, Payton said then. The league informed the Saints at the start of the playoffs that it was reopening its bounty investigation. Cornwell said Loomis and Payton then told Williams, "Theres no place for this in this organization or this league." The NFL, however, in its statement last month announcing the penalties for team officials, said the GM and coach made only "cursory inquiries" into the possible presence of a bounty program. Paytons suspension -- due to start last Sunday -- has been on hold pending his appeal, allowing him to get in a few extra days of work as he rushes to create a plan thats as detailed as possible for the Saints 2012 season. The results of the appeals could affect whether Bill Parcells, who turns 71 in August, comes out of retirement to take over as interim coach while his former offensive assistant and protege is suspended. Beyond the punishment for Saints coaches and executives, the NFL still has to determine whether players who were involved in the bounty program will also be disciplined. The NFL has said as many as 27 players also could be sanctioned for their role in the scandal. The NFLs investigation in New Orleans found that Payton initially lied to league investigators about the existence of a bounty program and instructed his defensive assistants to do the same. It also found that Loomis did not do enough to put a stop to the enterprise after he was informed that the league was looking into it. Payton twice apologized for his role in the bounty program, saying he takes "full responsibility" for a system that operated for three years under his watch. ------ AP Sports Writer Brett Martel in New Orleans contributed to this report. Cheap Ray Ban Sunglasses . The eight-team, single-elimination CIS championship, hosted by Laval University for the sixth time in history and the first time since 2003, gets under way Friday with the quarter-final round and concludes Sunday at 4:30 p.m. with the gold-medal final. ray ban sunglasses slae . The words "curling" and "celebrity" arent usually found in the same sentence, but brilliant play on the ice is ensuring plenty of exposure off it for British womens skip Eve Muirhead.NEW YORK -- Characterizing their meeting with the NFL about their disapproval of the use of Redskins by the Washington franchise as disappointing, representatives of the Oneida Indian Nation requested a meeting with all 32 NFL owners during Super Bowl week. They hope to persuade the other team owners and commissioner Roger Goodell to put pressure on Redskins owner Daniel Snyder to drop the nickname they find offensive. "Given the way the meeting transpired," Ray Halbritter, an Oneida representative and leader of the "Change the Mascot Campaign," said Wednesday, "it became somewhat evident they were defending the continued use of the name. Of course, were disappointed." The Oneidas asked Goodell and Snyder to "visit our homelands," and sought an amendment to league bylaws to prohibit franchises from naming a team with any term that is a racial epithet. Halbritter says the dictionary defines the word redskins precisely that way. And Halbritters group asked Goodell to "use his power to bring Snyder before the league executive committee for possible sanctions" should the team continue to use the name. The NFL released a statement about the meeting, which Goodell did not attend. The NFL was represented by senior vice-president Adolpho Birch, and executive vice-presidents Jeff Pash and Paul Hicks. Pash is the leagues general counsel. "We met at the request of Ray Halbritter of the Oneida Nation," the statement said. "We listened and respectfully discussed the views of Mr. Halbritter, Oneida Nation Wolf Clan Representative Keller George and their colleagues as well as the sharply differing views of many other Native Americans and fans in general. The meeting was part of an ongoing dialogue to facilitate listening and learning, consistent with the commissioners comments earlier this year." Many of the Oneidaas requests were contained in a letter handed to the NFL representatives at the meeting. ray ban sunglasses outlet. Since President Barack Obama recently said he would "think about changing" the name if he owned the team, many fans have taken up the cause. And many more have rallied around a name they see as a tradition or a tribute. Halbritter sees it as offensive and demeaning. In a letter to Goodell, he said the Change the Mascot campaign sought to "finally halt the destruct effects of the R-word on our people and Native peoples everywhere. Additionally, as financial sponsors of the league, we are concerned that the leagues marketing of a racially derogatory term undermines the NFLs ability to be a unifying force in America." NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said the Oneida Indian Nation is not a league sponsor. The Oneida Indian Nation sponsors the Bills and the Wisconsin tribe of the Oneida nation does have a sponsorship deal with the Packers. The Oneida Indian Nation, which has approximately 1,000 enrolled members, is one of 566 federally recognized sovereign Native American nations, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior/Indian Affairs. Also Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle said it will no longer use the term "Redskins" when referring to the team. Managing Editor Audrey Cooper said the newspapers style committee decided to eliminate the term because of a long-standing policy against using racial slurs. "Not everyone has to be personally offended by a word to make it a slur," Cooper said in a statement titled "A name unfit for print. Make no mistake,redskin is a patently racist term." The Chronicle joins several other publications that have made the same decision over the years, including the Kansas City Star, Slate.com, and the Portland Oregonian, which dropped the term more than two decades ago. ' ' '
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