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Whenever your mouse moves  
By lluggg498 on Mar 20, 2014 05:35 AM
Well, this is a really interesting question. The reason might be different from University to University but I can outline the general differences. most (probably close to 99%) of the Public Universities are run by individual states. So, for example, Cornell and UCLA are both run by their respective states, New York and California. For the most part this doesn matter in terms of the quality of the education. For example, Cornell is an Ivy League school (the only public Ivy League School) and many of the UC schools are world class (UC Davis, UCLA, and UC Berkeley especially). What great about state universities is that if you are a resident of that state, the tuition is usually very affordable. (as long as you are a resident of that state).However, because they are run by the state their budget is ultimately controlled by the state government. This can be awful in times of economic problems. The University of Florida (which is a good state university) has had huge budget cuts because of the financial mess, not to mention that a hostile political party could try to enact politically motivated budget changes to Universities. This is where one of the big benefits of private universities come in.Universities like MIT and Stanford do not have their budgets determined by the government (although a lot of their research funding, particularly for STEM fields, does end up coming from government grants, but that not the same as budgetary control). So MIT is able to spend its money how it sees fit. This gives the institution the ability to pursue research or implement programs without fear of political backlash in the form of budget cuts (supposedly).Many institutions use this to their advantage and I don think it a coincidence that many of the best universities in the US are private. But 100% of those respected private universities are also non profit, so they are given tax exemption by promising not to make a profit (Like how the Red Cross is a private institution but is non profit). What the Universities end up doing with their money is putting them in endowments, you can read about endowments here.Many private institutions charge much more for the degree, but are able to provide more scholarships to people who cannot afford it, and unlike student loans, scholarships don have to be paid back.Private universities that are for profit are not usually seen very favorably in the US (or UK, for that matter).This is a huge topic, and I don pretend to have touched all the main points, but the original point: private =/= for profit is definitely true. I have attended universities in the US and the UK and I can say from experience, there are many benefits to not having to answer to the government when dealing with how an academic institution should spend its money. That being said, I also think it really admirable how many countries in Europe make it such a priority to keep higher education free or very cheap. I just think that can only work when the government stays out of the policy making public universities, which isn happening in the US or the UK.One point I just like to end with. Many young people in the US make a very expensive and well intentioned mistake when choosing where to go to university. Instead of staying in cheap nfl jerseys state and going to a public university, they choose to move to another state and attend either a private university, or a public university but have to pay non resident costs. This should happen way less. I tell everyone that asks me, unless there is a very specific reason you want to go out of state or to a private university, don it just not worth the extra cost. Are tuition fees to high in many places? Absolutely, but I think many students make it worse for themselves.Anyway, if you have any more questions I be glad to answer, and sorry if this seems like a rant, it just such a huge topic!Others have given good answers about how circuits work. I would like to add though that understanding how the low level bits of Gates and ALUs to what is displayed on the screen requires learning about a lot of different components. Let take for granted what others have already described: Using some primitive logic gates, we can create a CPU cheap jerseys that takes in instructions and manipulates data accordingly.How does that get to your screen? If all the CPU outputs is 1 and 0 how does that become the information that makes up what you see on the display? As we said earlier, we take the fact that we get CPUs for granted. Now let work the other way.Each pixel on your monitor is made up of 3 sub pixels. 1 red, 1 green, and 1 blue (This is known as RGB). It turns out (even though it beyond the scope of this question) that you only need those three colors to reproduce all the colors we can see. By varying the relative intensity of each of the sub pixels, each pixel gets its color. Okay, great, moving forward. How do we control those relative intensities? Each sub pixel has a range from 0 to 255. This means that for each pixel we have 3 associated values (each value being within the range I just mentioned). So for a pixel to be black, all three sub pixels will have a value of 0. (RGB 0 0 0), for white, each one will have a value of 255 (RGB 255 255 255). This link explains it furtherLuckily for us (because engineers designed it this way). This range (0 255) is able to be perfectly represented in binary. As you can probably see, we getting closer to bridging the gap now that everything can speak the same language (Binary). So, you probably heard that computer has RAM. This is the temporary memory that your computer uses as it goes about its business. In the simplest case, there is a section of RAM that is reserved for the bits that represent your display. So in this reserved section of RAM all cheap jerseys the 1 and 0 correspond to sub pixels on the monitor. Whenever your mouse moves or a webpage refreshes, your computer alters the 1 and 0 in this reserved space, and then your graphics card pushes those values unto the appropriate sub pixels, allowing you to see the change.Now, I will say it actually a bit more complicated than this, modern computers off load a bunch of this (including the reserved memory space) to the graphics card. But the concepts still hold true.
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